Have You Heard From Johannesburg - Seven Stories of the GLOBAL anti-apartheid movement

Robert Hughes
Robert Hughes

British Anti-Apartheid Movement

Hughes' experience in South Africa imbued him with a life-long revulsion to racism, discrimination and injustice. He was soon drawn into politics and elected to the position of Chairperson of the Aberdeen City Labour Party. He was a trustee of the Canon Collins Educational Trust for South Africa, Chairperson of the Southern Africa Committee of the Movement for Colonial Freedom and Chair of the AAM from 1976 until its dissolution in 1995.

Ron Dellums
Ron Dellums

U.S. Congressman (CA)

Ron Dellums served in the United States Marine Corps from 1954 to 1956 after he was denied the college scholarship he had sought.  After service in the Marines, Dellums, with the help of the G.I Bill and an outside job, attended San Francisco State College where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1960.  This was followed by an M.A. in Social Welfare from the University of California at Berkeley in 1962...

Ron Segal
Ron Segal

anti-apartheid activist; editor of Africa South

Ron Segal was educated at Cape Town University, majoring in English and Latin, and at Trinity College, Cambridge. In 1956, in Cape Town, he launched Africa South, a magazine critical of the policies of the Nationalist government.  He became a marked man, not helped by a speaking tour of US campuses, where he argued with passion for an economic boycott.

Rona Bailey
Rona Bailey

New Zealand Communist Party; anti-apartheid activist

Labeled 'the High Priestess of New Zealand Communism' by former Prime Minister Robert Muldoon, Rona Bailey bestrode left-wing politics, dance and the theatre in New Zealand for more than 60 years. In the late 1930s, she studied dance with the legendary Martha Graham at Columbia University in New York. Back in New Zealand, she joined the New Zealand Communist Party in 1943, and pioneered the teaching of modern dance.

Salim Salim
Salim Salim

Organisation of African Unity; Tanzanian Minister of Foreign Affairs

Salim Ahmed Salim was born in 1942 on the island of Zanzibar, now part of the United Republic of Tanzania. As a young student, Salim was active in politics and founded the All-Zanzibar Student Union in 1960 of which he became the first Vice-President...

Sam Ramsamy
Sam Ramsamy

South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee

Sam Ramsamy grew up in a highly politicised environment with his father being a trade unionist. He and his four siblings attended Depot Road Primary School and matriculated at Sastri College, the first high school for Indians. From an early age, Ramsamy learnt the importance of equality and non-racialism...

Shridath 'Sonny' Ramphal
Shridath 'Sonny' Ramphal

Commonwealth Secretary-General

Shridath "Sonny" Surendranath Ramphal was born on 3 October 1928 in New Amsterdam, British Guiana. Ramphal attended a private school founded by his father in the capital city, Georgetown. He was also educated at the Modern Educational Institute. He completed his secondary education at Queen’s College, a government school in Georgetown. In 1947, Ramphal began his legal training at King’s College, London...

Sipho Makana
Sipho Makana

African National Congress

Born in Fort Beaufort in the Eastern Cape, he later went to Fort Hare where he became a staunch member of the ANC Youth League. He was expelled in 1959 because of his political activities...

Steve Phillips
Steve Phillips

Stanford Out Of South Africa

Steve grew up in Ohio, where his mother was a public school teacher and his father was a physician. He attended Stanford University, where he was active in the student government, the Black Student Union, and the South African divestment movement. Steve helped build a coalition of students, faculty and staff (Stanford Out Of South Africa) that pushed Stanford to make a partial divestment from companies doing business in apartheid South Africa...

Syd Jackson
Syd Jackson

Halt All Racist Tours; Maori activist

Protest against sporting contacts with South Africa goes back a long way in New Zealand. In 1928 and 1949, it was Maori who initiated the protests against New Zealand rugby tours to South Africa. The same was true for the 1970 tour. During Easter 1968, the Federation of Maori Students met in Auckland. Syd Jackson, son of 1937 All Black Everard Jackson, proposed that the 1970 rugby tour of South Africa be opposed, irrespective of whether or not Maori rugby players were allowed into South Africa as part of the team.