Have You Heard From Johannesburg - Seven Stories of the GLOBAL anti-apartheid movement

Damu Smith
Damu Smith

Washington Office on Africa; Artists for a Free South Africa

Damu Smith grew up in the tough Carr Square Village housing project of St. Louis and he idolized his father one of the city's few black firefighters. As a high school student, Smith attended a Jesuit-run, after-school program for “disadvantaged male youth”.

Danisa Baloyi
Danisa Baloyi

Coalition For A Free South Africa

During the 1980's Dr. Baloyi was a student at Columbia University, and became involved in the divestment movement against South Africa. In 1985 a series of protests culminated in a student takeover of Hamilton Hall. Ultimately student pressure helped push Columbia University to divest it's holdings from companies doing business in South Africa...

Danny Glover
Danny Glover

TransAfrica

While attending San Francisco State University, Glover was a member of the Black Students Union which, along with the Third World Liberation Front and the American Federation of Teachers, collaborated in a five-month student-led strike to establish a Department of Black Studies. It helped create not only the first Department of Black Studies but also the first School of Ethnic Studies in the U.S. 

David De Beer
David De Beer

KAIROS

Through KAIROS, a Dutch church organization set up as an international solidarity group connected to Dr. Beyers Naudé’s South African Christian Institute, De Beer became involved in the helping the Dutch become more aware of the real situation for blacks in South Africa.

David Haslam
David Haslam

End Loans to South Africa; World Council of Churches.

Methodist minister Rev. David Haslam was inspired to tackle injustice in the world after attending a World Council of Churches conference in Sweden 1968 which included speakers such as American writer and civil rights activist James Baldwin; he then attended the WCC’s Notting Hill Consultation in 1969, which generated the Programme to Combat Racism.

David Kenvyn
David Kenvyn

British Anti-Apartheid Movement

David Kenvyn first encountered apartheid at around age 7 when he attended a sermon about South Africa by Father Trevor Huddleston, fresh from his tenure as parish priest in the township of Sophiatown.

Dennis Brutus
Dennis Brutus

South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee

Dennis Brutus was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (present day Zimbabwe) in 1924.  His parents moved to Port Elizabeth, South Africa where he grew up. He graduated from the University of Fort Hare with distinction in English.  His studies in law at the University of Witwatersrand were cut short by his imprisonment in 1960 for breaking the terms of his banning...

Desmond Tutu
Desmond Tutu

South African Council of Churches

Archbishop Desmond Tutu was born in Klerksdorp on 7 October 1931. As a youngster he attended mission schools in Klerksdorp. In 1954 Tutu completed a teaching diploma from the Pretoria Bantu Normal College and later a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South Africa (UNISA). After three years in the teaching profession Tutu quit in protest against the deteriorating standard of Black education. This was due to the implementation of the Bantu Education Act of 1953, which reduced Black education to second rate...

Diana Collins
Diana Collins

International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa

She was born Diana Clavering Elliot at Stutton Hall, Suffolk, the home of her grandparents, on August 13, 1917. Her father was at that time serving with the Suffolk Regiment in France. Dame Diana Collins was the widow of Canon John Collins, the controversial Canon of St Paul's Cathedral with an international reputation for his leadership of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and the British campaign against apartheid in South Africa...

Donna Katzin
Donna Katzin

Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility

From 1986 until July of 1994 Katzin served as Director of South Africa and International Justice Programs for the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR). In that capacity she worked with religious bodies, institutional investors and community organizations to exert economic pressure to end apartheid and promote responsible reinvestment after apartheid.