Have You Heard From Johannesburg - Seven Stories of the GLOBAL anti-apartheid movement

Sylvia Hill
Sylvia Hill

TransAfrica; Free South Africa Movement

Sylvia Hill received her doctorate in education from the University of Oregon in 1971 after having majored in psychology at Howard University.  Dr. Hill wanted to establish direct connections between African liberation movements and African-Americans and with a small group of fellow activists - almost all women – she founded a small group called the Southern Africa News Collective, which grew into the Southern Africa Support Project (SASP) in 1978.

Tim Smith
Tim Smith

Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility

Tim Smith attended the University of Toronto and Union Theological Seminary in the 1960s, and began to do field work with a group called the University Christian Movement in Southern Africa Committee.  While at UTS, Smith participated in a series of demonstrations in front of bank branches in New York City.

Tom Newnham
Tom Newnham

Citizens' Association for Racial Equality

Tom Newnham was one of the founding fathers of anti-apartheid activism in New Zealand. It could be argued that he was the founding father. But for Tom, just as important as the anti-apartheid campaign was the campaign against racism inside New Zealand. His involvement with race issues began in the late 1950s, when he joined the campaign to stop the New Zealand rugby team going to South Africa without Maori players. In 1964, he was one of a handful of people who formed CARE (Citizens' Association for Racial Equality).

Tony Glover
Tony Glover

Coalition for a Free South Africa

Tony Glover grew up in a welfare household in a poor district of the Bronx. He became involved in the Coalition For a Free Southern Africa while he was studying at Columbia University, which aimed at educating students about the situation in South Africa.

Trevor Richards
Trevor Richards

Halt All Racist Tours

Trevor Richards was born in 1946 in New Zealand. As a young student leader at Auckland University, Richards was deeply disturbed by the oppression and exploitation of black people in South Africa and joined the ranks of the anti-apartheid movement.

Trond Bakkevig
Trond Bakkevig

World Council of Churches

Dr. Bakkevig graduated in theology at the Faculty of Theology in Oslo in 1974, and ten years later he became a doctor of theology at the University of Oslo. He was Secretary General of the Church of Norway’s Council for almost nine years beginning in 1978, and played an active role among churches internationally in coordinating worldwide public condemnation of apartheid.

Vella Pillay
Vella Pillay

British Anti-Apartheid Movement; SA Indian Congress; SA Communist Party

Vella Pillay was born in Johannesburg, and went as a part-time student to the University of the Witwatersrand, gaining a bachelor of commerce degree in 1948. Becoming politically aware at university, he joined the Federation of Progressive Students and was active in the Transvaal Indian Congress.

Vesla Vetlesen
Vesla Vetlesen

Norwegian Union Leader

Vesla Vetlesen’s childhood was marked by the Nazi occupation of Norway during World War II.  For a period, her family's home at Storhaug was the location for production of the illegal newspapers Stritt folk and Frihet. She was a communist during her early life, chairing the regional chapter of the Young Communist League of Norway in Rogaland from 1948 to 1949.

Vladimir Shemiatenkov
Vladimir Shemiatenkov

Soviet Communist Party International Department

Vladimir Shemiatenkov dealt with South African affairs from 1960 until 1965. Upon Oliver Tambo’s arrival in the Moscow in 1963, Shemiatenkov was assigned to accompany the exiled ANC leader on a Soviet-sponsored rest stay in a sanatorium in the Crimea, where he and Tambo became close friends, frequently hosting Tambo in his home on subsequent visits to the USSR.

Vladimir Shubin
Vladimir Shubin

Operation Solidarity Movement, Soviet Communist Party


Vladimir Shubin served as Secretary of the Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee and Head of the Africa Section of the CPSU International Department, and was the Soviet representative to the first African National Congress (ANC) National Conference after its unbanning.